Unlocking Cultural Open Access Toward Heavy Metal Studies

Heavy Metal Studies Unlocking Cultural, Open Access Research

Given its popularity, visibility and complexity, the scholarly attention to heavy metal studies needs no justification. Like other popular music cultures, heavy metal is a contested and controversial marker of both cultural resistance and sub-cultural conformity, offering a resource that enables individualised identity-formation and collective practices of association, consumption and commodification that are now global in character and complexity. At the same time, when compared to research on punk, electronic music and other scenes, the study of heavy metal was slow to get going, with substantial studies not appearing until the 1990s.

The Audacity of Horror, or Paradoxes of the Heart

The Audacity of Horror, or Paradoxes of the Heart

In her study ‘Bloodscripts: Writing the Violent Subject’ (2003), Elena Gomel looks precisely at the narrative influence on violent behaviour and examines the way popular culture constructs violent subjectivity (for instance, in serial killers or perpetrators of genocide). She also claims that being a killer is the end result of social construction, just like being a woman or a man, and looks at modes in which narrative representation contributes to our capability of committing violent acts and resistance to them.

Teaching Horror Literature in a Multicultural Classroom

Teaching Horror Literature in a Multicultural Classroom

When German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer asserted that there are “two kinds of authors: those who write for the subject’s sake, and those who write for writing’s sake”, he pinpointed the critical problem that presents itself before scholars, critics, teachers and students of literature who attempt to discern which, out of a myriad of published texts, are the ones worth reading and teaching.

An Aesthetic Discourse About Alternative Cultures

An Aesthetic Discourse About Alternative Cultures

The word “culture” derives from the Latin “colere,” a verb to describe tending and developing agriculture. With the advent of capitalism’s division of labour, culture came both to embody instrumentalism and to abjure it, via the industrialisation of farming, on the one hand, and the cultivation of individual taste, on the other.

Spiritualism, the Enemy of Cold Intellectual Reasoning

Spiritualism, the Enemy of Cold Intellectual Reasoning

The great mystic of the eighteenth-century, the ardent disciple of Jakob Böhme — Louis Claude de Saint-Martin — used to say in the last years of his life: “I would have loved to meet more with those who guess at truths, for such alone are living men.”

Our Seventh Anniversary Bares A Colombian Crown

Our Seventh Anniversary Bares A Colombian Crown

Among the matters of most profound importance such as our distinct literary proposition to open access scholarly articles as an aesthetic medium, perhaps none is more fundamental than that which is concerned with weighing up and appraising the worth of our seventh anniversary in a spiritual inquiry fostered by confidence as to whether its cultural value is a definite quality conspicuous of continuation or a negative detachment from our proposed origins.

The Skeptical Artistry Of Horror In Everyday Life

The Skeptical Artistry Of Horror In Everyday Life

Truth be told, just because of the vigorous fondness elicited by the horror genre and the maddening acts that are depicted in it, to those sensitive to hideous misdemeanours, it is unthinkable not to discern that some justification or defence is needed. There are some obvious strategies for this, for example, raising the standards of “art for art’s sake,” or, by mere distinction, explicating the value of horror in its moral or educational value. Furthermore, there are also strategies bewitching to other categories of value, along the lines of Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche’s explanation of the value of calamity as a Dionysian rallying cry.

An Open Access Perspective In Practical Discourses

An Open Access Perspective In Practical Discourses

As William H. Sewell, a historian and cultural researcher eloquently once stated, the great paradox of contemporary and alternative cultural discourse is reflected in anthropology, the queen of the field, which invented the term culture, “or at least shaped it into something like its present form,” but because of a “severe identity crisis” viewed the question as to the nature of culture as being irrelevant.

Doing The Devil’s Work Or Conjuring Christianity’s Cabala?

Doing The Devil’s Work Or Conjuring Christianity’s Cabala?

In our bid to disrupt everyday assumptions, writings nowadays classed as “devilish” tend to trade in the unusual and the unexpected. Most of the articles we publish evoke an uncanny atmosphere; many portray extreme situations, and some include elements of surrealism. All in all, this historical and alternative cultural oddness has generated social comparisons with subversive, extreme and nihilistic art forms such as absurdist theatre, film noir, downhearted music, grimoire literature from ancient to contemporary alternative countercultures. Howbeit, so far very little has been written that refute society’s “devilish” argument if we examine the origins of the occult and its relationship with Christianity’s Cabala, and most importantly, why now?

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