Getting Out of the Asylum in the Nineteenth-Century

Getting Out of the Asylum in the Nineteenth-Century

Between 1800 and 1914, no western country was spared the rapid construction of asylums and an apparently insatiable demand for institutional accommodation. Three hundred thousand persons were committed to asylums in England and Wales in the nineteenth-century; by the Great War, close to one-quarter of a million Americans occupied state mental hospitals.

Historical Deadly Asylums In The United Kingdom

Historical Deadly Asylums in the United Kingdom

The history of psychiatry and institutional mental asylums has attracted considerable attention during recent decades from both social historians and psychiatrists. Each group has contributed to the narrative of the rise of the lunatic asylum and the professionalisation of “psychiatry.” The historical inquiries and the methodological approaches adopted by the two fields have led to interpretations that often question, and conflict with, each other. Social historians have emphasised the need to place “alienists” and the asylum in their social context. This enables changes in social structures and relationships to be determined and their influence on professional interests to be assessed. Psychiatrists, or amateur historians as they are sometimes labelled, have tended to construct their work within a medical model that attempts to legitimise the activities of present day psychiatry.

Insane Literature in Asylums during the Nineteenth-Century

Insane Literature in Asylums during the Nineteenth-Century

Nineteenth-century asylums evoke terrible images of dark and dirty cells, shrieking lunatics, horrible experiments, and abusive doctors. The disturbing nature of these impressions is not unfounded. Abuse and poor conditions in the United States of America mental institutions have been well documented. Former patients often published sensational exposés to reveal the dark and horrid nature of these secret places. However, for most of the nineteenth-century, the asylum was also conceived of as a beacon of human rights, an enlightened institution to protect and cure the mentally ill. This saintly image was occasionally upheld by the patients themselves, through periodical literature published from within the asylums. The most prolific of these, ‘The Opal’ was written, edited, and printed by patients in the New York State Lunatic Asylum at Utica, and sold to the public for a profit.

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