Horror Films and the Proximity of Religious Iconography

Horror Films and the Proximity of Religious Iconography

Horror films and the relationship between religion and filmmaking has always been a bit uncertain. From the very beginning, religious themes, stories, and metaphors were prominent in the cinema, at times taking on epic proportions and frequently carrying enormous symbolic freight. And yet rarely have films treated religious faith on its own terms or explored religious values and motivations with much depth and complexity (even and especially when they have been intentional in telling religious stories).

The Representation of Monstrosity in Cinematic Horror

The Representation of Monstrosity in Cinematic Horror

What, if anything, do the monsters of horror cinema have in common, besides the fact that they are not real? They may be human — just think of Norman Bates, Leatherface, or Hannibal Lecter — but they are not real, in the sense of experientially real. They may even be non-fictional — just think of ‘Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer’ (1990), a film about real-life mass murderer Henry Lee Lucas — but that still does not make them real (the Henry Lee Lucas of the film is just an actor, Michael Rooker, pretending to be the serial killer).

Toward an Aesthetics of Cinematic Horror in Culture

Toward an Aesthetics of Cinematic Horror in Culture

Since the dawn of man, there have been stories told to frighten others. Some of the elements of horror are present in the form of massive epics like ‘The Odyssey’ or ‘Beowulf,’ where monsters and men interact on an alarmingly regular basis, but horror, as we understand it today, has been shaped not only by the distance of time but also of geography.

The Bride of Frankenstein Finds a Mahlerian Voice

The Bride of Frankenstein Finds a Mahlerian Voice

In 1931, Universal Pictures released James Whale’s ‘Frankenstein,’ a horror film whose music score is confined to its credits, featuring a monster denied the power of speech. By 1935 — with Hollywood having embraced the almost wall-to-wall scoring procedures of Maximilian Raoul Steiner and Erich Wolfgang Korngold — James Whale’s follow-up ‘Bride of Frankenstein’ calls upon the resources of Franz Waxman’s music to lend the Monster a voice: a voice that, in turn, seems to awaken the character’s ability to communicate.

The Popular French Horror Films Language

The Popular French Horror Films Language

Traditionally, Québécois cinema has been associated with two broad practices. On one hand, we find auteur films: relatively small-scale projects that typically focus on ambivalent individuals struggling with existential angst and moving within a narrative world where realism hides deeper humanist concerns.

Looking to create, optimize or maintain your site having performance in mind?

We provide an all-in-one service to convert, maintain, host, and deploy while collaborating with a professional team of experts effortlessly.