Introduction to the Gothic Series: Welcome to Hell

Introduction to the Gothic Series: Welcome to Hell

In 2019, London was host to an immersive zombie exhibition at the Truman Brewery, Brick Lane in East London attached to the television show ‘The Walking Dead’, a new play about Dracula was staged at the London Library and an art installation, sponsored by the Ben Oakley Gallery and called ‘Monster’ by Giles Walker, featuring headless clowns and other freakery, was set to be held in an empty warehouse near Greenwich later in the year if sufficient crowd funds could be raised.

The Evolution of Occultism in Gaming

The Evolution of Occultism in Gaming

Gaming has always had a close relationship with the occult. This is obvious for anyone who has followed our many features on horror, mysticism, and Gnosticism in different media. While occultism in movies and traditional literature allows viewers to peek into other worlds, occultism in gaming thrusts players into these worlds head-on.

Beginnings and Bloodlines of Vampires and Revenants

Beginnings and Bloodlines of Vampires and Revenants

Of the particular vampire fiction that has, in the last 1960s, crossed over into film and subsequently redefined the vampire subgenre — that is to say, dismantled its “inherited conventions of the particular filmic kind in order to display [its] formal and ideological complexity, but also in order to put them back together, so to speak, in better working condition than before”, to borrow from Carl Freedman’s (2002: 91) analysis of the works of Stanly Kubrick — none in this category has achieved greater distinction perhaps than Richard Matheson’s 1954 vampire novel ‘I Am Legend’.

Japanese Horror Art in Cinema and Their American Remakes

Japanese Horror Art in Cinema and Their American Remakes

Upon its release in 1998, the Japanese horror film ‘Ringu’ (Hideo Nakata) quickly attained cult status in the East, subsequently inspiring an American adaptation, ‘The Ring’ (Gore Verbinski, 2002). This sparked a trend in which Hollywood began remaking Japanese and Asian horror films.

The Cultural Experience of Contemporary Horror Cinema

The Cultural Experience of Contemporary Horror Cinema

As a popular form, its pervasiveness has seen it succeed as a modern series of blockbusters (‘The Mummy’ [1999– 2008], and ‘Hellboy’ [2004–2008] films), independent breakthroughs (‘The Blair Witch Project’ [1999], and ‘The Sixth Sense’ [1999]), films for children and young adults (‘Coraline’ [2009], and ‘Twilight’ [2008]), and innovative international arthouse releases (‘El labertino del fauno’ [‘Pan’s Labyrinth’, 2006], and ‘Låt den rätte komma in’ [‘Let the Right One In’, 2008]).

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